[SportMed] SPORTS MEDICINE : MEDICAL: RESEARCH : MEDICAL: CONDITIONS: CONCUSSIONS : MEDICAL: TREATMENTS: Study: Removing Athletes from Play Improves Post-Concussion Recovery

 

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SPORTS MEDICINE :

MEDICAL: RESEARCH :

MEDICAL: CONDITIONS: CONCUSSIONS :

MEDICAL: TREATMENTS:

Study: Removing Athletes from Play Improves Post-Concussion Recovery

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Study: Removing Athletes from Play Improves Post-Concussion Recovery

August 29, 2016 12:00 AM

By Elizabeth Bloom

Pittsburgh Post Gazette

http://www.post-gazette.com/sports/highschool/2016/08/29/
Concussion-study-fortifies-appropriate-treatment-for-young-athletes/
stories/201608290020

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/jd97ba6

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Researchers at UPMC and three universities have found that young athletes who continued to play a sport immediately after a concussion took twice as much time to recover and experienced worse and more symptoms than athletes who were removed from that activity. Their study, Removal From Play After Concussion and Recovery Time, was published online and is included in the September issue of the journal Pediatrics.

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Scientists have long accepted the notion that athletes should be removed from play after concussions. This study fortifies that viewpoint, and researchers hope it will persuade athletes to sit on the sidelines after a concussion.

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I am very confident in these results, said Elbin, the lead researcher on the study, who is now on the faculty of the University of Arkansas.

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While a study published in April used medical records to study the effect of delayed reporting and removal from activity on concussion recovery, this is the first study to use clinical data to study that issue. The study also supports removal from play status as a predictor of protracted recoveries  ones that take at least 21 days. That variable  whether an athlete was removed from play  was a stronger predictor of such lengthy recoveries than previously known factors such as sex and age, according to the research.

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Being or not being removed from play carried a lot more variance than any of those other variables, said Michael Micky Collins, director of the UPMC Sports Medicine Concussion Program and a member of the research team.

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Athletes wouldnt run a marathon on a sprained ankle or throw a football with a broken arm, yet they often downplay concussion symptoms to return to competition. In the heat of a game they might not even recognize the injury, so its important that clinicians be on hand to identify the symptoms and remove players, Collins said.

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The study was based on an analysis of two groups of athletes age 12-19 who were treated at UPMCs concussion clinic. One cohort of 35 players was removed from a sport after a concussion, while the remaining athletes continued to play for an average of about 19 minutes. The cohorts represented contact and non-contact sports, including football, soccer, ice hockey and volleyball.

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The researchers compared players baseline and post-concussion neurocognitive scores, which were measured with the UPMC-designed ImPACT tool. Collins and fellow researcher Philip Schatz of Saint Josephs University in Philadelphia are a shareholder of and consultant for ImPACT, respectively.

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The athletes were evaluated at two clinical visits, one that took place within a week of the injury and another 8-30 days after it.

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On average, the recovery time among athletes who continued to play after a concussion was twice as long (44 days) as those of athletes who were removed from activity (22 days). During recovery, the cohort that was not removed from play exhibited worse symptoms, such as poorer visual and verbal memory, and more of them. And they were 8.8 times more likely to have a recovery of at least three weeks.

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The complete article may be read at the URL above.

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Removal From Play After Concussion and Recovery Time

R.J. Elbin, Alicia Sufrinko, Philip Schatz, Jon French, Luke Henry, Scott Burkhart, Michael W. Collins, Anthony P. Kontos

Pediatrics

August 2016

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Despite increases in education and awareness, many athletes continue to play with signs and symptoms of a sport-related concussion (SRC). The impact that continuing to play has on recovery is unknown. This study compared recovery time and related outcomes between athletes who were immediately removed from play and athletes who continued to play with an SRC.

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snip

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CONCLUSIONS: SRC recovery time may be reduced if athletes are removed from participation. Immediate removal from play is the first step in mitigating prolonged SRC recovery, and these data support current consensus statements and management guidelines.

Accepted June 6, 2016.

Copyright  2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2016/08/25/
peds.2016-0910?sso=1&sso_redirect_count=1&nfstatus=401&nftoken=
00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000&nfstatusdescription=
ERROR%3a+No+local+token

OR

http://tinyurl.com/j3v6d3x

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Playing With a Concussion Doubles Recovery Time

By RACHEL RABKIN PEACHMAN

August 29, 2016

New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/29/well/move/ playing-with-a-concussion-doubles-recovery-time.html

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/htlrtjt

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The findings may help doctors promote the message that taking immediate precautions after concussion will actually allow the athlete more opportunities to keep playing, not fewer. Resting immediately in the 24 to 48 hours following a concussion (and then slowly returning to normal activities under the supervision of a physician) reduces the possibility of further stress on the system and allows brain cells to heal faster so that athletes can get back to their sport more quickly. Its something that we consistently preach to coaches, parents and kids, said R.J. Elbin, who led the study while at the University of Pittsburgh but who now is director of the Office for Sport Concussion Research at the University of Arkansas. However, until now, there really has not been any data that supports this idea.

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Estimates show that each year in the United States, there are up to 3.8 million sports-related concussions, which can happen when there is a blow or jolt to the head that causes the brain to bounce within the skull, stretching and damaging brain cells. Symptoms of concussion may include dizziness, confusion, nausea and sensitivity to light.

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Young athletes are particularly prone to prolonged recovery and complications from concussion. The developing brain has been shown to be more vulnerable to the physiological effects of the injury, said Tad Seifert, a neurologist and director of the Sports Concussion Program for Norton Healthcare, in Louisville, Ky.

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Despite increased awareness of the dangers of concussions and efforts to educate those in the sports community on how to recognize and treat the head injury, an estimated 50 to 70 percent of concussions go unreported. While some athletes and coaches may not always recognize the signs of concussion, the larger concern is a sports mind-set that frowns on leaving the game.

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The idea of being a football player is that were tough. We get back up. We dont cry. We dont make a big deal out of it, Mr. Dicks said. There is the idea that you must sacrifice your body and your brain for the overall greater good of the team.

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The complete article may be read at the URL above.

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Author: jwneastro

I am a reference librarian at Temple University and a specialist in bibliographic database searching.

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